MASCARA DE CERA

There are people who are born to make music, others are born to hearing.
Whenever was part of this second group.
I'm just an addict... addicted to music.
Maybe it's a habit, I gotta use, even if it's, rock, jazz or the quiet storm.
Gosto mais de música que de lasanha.

THE RESIDENTS is my Biggest Addiction.
Other musical priorities are:
OLD TIME RELIJUN-ARRINGTON de DIONYSO, R. STEVIE MOORE, THE RED KRAYOLA,SHRIMP BOAT, SMEGMA,THE FIBONACCIS, THE SUN CITY GIRLS, LEGENDARY PINK DOTS, ESKIMO, SLINT, FRANK ZAPPA, CAPTAIN BEEFHEART, THE VELVET UNDERGROUND, HENRY FLYNT, PATTI SMITH, THE FEELIES, PERE UBU, THE CLASH, JOY DIVISION, SNAKEFINGER, MILES DAVIS, SUN RA, KRAFTWERK, ANAL MAGIC & REV. DWIGHT FRIZZELL, MOONDOG, THE WORK, RAYMOND SCOTT, SLAPPY, HAPPY, ART BEARS, NAKED CITY, HENRY COW, BONGWATER, SHELLAC, BLURT, GLAXO BABIES, WEEN, THIS HEAT, THE SEA AND CAKE, SAVAGE REPUBLIC, TUXEDO MOON, XTC, CAN, FAUST, THINKING FELLERS UNION LOCAL 282,THE EX, DANIEL SMITH- DANIELSON FAMILE,TOMAHWAK, FANTOMAS, MR. BUNGLE, MIKE PATTON, SUICIDE, THE GO-BETWEENS, STEREOLAB, SPACEMEN 3, CHROME, PRIMUS -LES CLAYPOOL, PRAM, BEACH HOUSE, THE OLIVIA TREMOR CONTROL, SWELL MAPS, SILVER APPES, MORPHINE, TELEVISION, DEVO, FLYING LIZARDS, THE POP GROUP, MINUTEMEN, MISSION OF BURMA, FUGAZI, WOVEN HAND- 16 HORSEPOWER- DAVID EUGENE EDWARDS, CHAD VANGAALEN, CRIME CITY SOLUTION, DAMIEN JURADO, DAVID DONDERO, CHELSEA WOLFE,THE BOOK OF KNOTS, FUGS, PEARLS BEFORE SWINE-TOM RAP, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-JOSEPH BYRD, FAMILY, GODZ, BONZO DOG DOO DAH BAND, PENTANGLE, THE INCREDIBLE STRING BAND, SLOVENLY, CHEER-ACCIDENT, SHOCKABILLY, EUGENE CHADBOURNE, BUTHOLE SURFERS, VAMPIRE RODENTS, TARWATER, COIL, THROBBING GRISTLE, SWELL, KEVIN COYNE, DAEVID ALLEN, ZOOGZ RIFT, SLEEPYTIME GORILLA MUSEUM, MX-80 SOUND, PAPA M, STUMP, RENALDO AND LOAF, THE BOOKS, NEW THRILL PARADE, NEW WET KOJAK, DAVID KILGOUR, LOW, VIC CHESNUTT, JOE HENRY, ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO, JON WAYNE,THE TAPE BEATLES, THE GUN CLUB, MAKE-UP,THE DENGUE FEVER, THE PAPER CHASE, RED RED MEAT, KARL BLACK- SOCK HEADDED PETERS- LEMON KITTENS, THE MUSIC TAPES, 17 PYGMIES, THE SHAGGS, BOBB TRIMBLE, ALTERNATIVE TV, FISH AND ROSES, DIABLO SWING ORCHESTRA, POP D`ELL ARTE, MLER IF DADA,TOM ZÉ, WALTER FRANCO, OS MUTANTES, CAETANO VELOSO, MILTON NASCIMENTO, ARNALDO ANTUNES, VINICIUS CANTUARIA, CAZUZA, CEREBRO ELECTRONICO, CORDEL DE FOGO ENCANTADO, ROGERIO SKYLAB, MUNDO LIVRE SA, NAÇÃO ZUMBI, ALÇEU VALENÇA, ANT- BEE, JOHN WILKES BOOZE, BILL FAY, WOVEN HAND, EL GUAPO, DAVID GRUBS, TORTOISE, SAM PREKOP, LUNGFISH, MAN MAN, LYDIA LUNCH, MARK KRAMER,THE FIERY FURNACES, HENRY KAISER, HOME & GARDEN, LOUNGE LIZARDS, JOHN LURIE, ANTON FIER- GOLDEN PALOMINOS, BOB DRAKE, MY DEAD IS DEAD, MICHAEL YONKERS, MINIMAL COMPACT, AKRON FAMILY, SWANS, THESE IMMORTAL SOULS, UNREST WORK & PLAY, THE TAPE BEATLES, SWOLLEN MONKEYS (Ralph Carney), SHELLEY HIRSCH, NEW YORK GONG, GONG, WALL OF VOODOO, LIARS, TIM HUEY, TOM WAITS, TRACHTENBURG FAMILY, THE TRIFFIDS, THE CRUEL SEA, THE MEKONS, THE METOD ACTORS, THE MISTAKES, THE MOUNTAIN GOATS, THE NEW CREATION, THE PIN GROUP, THE RENDERS, BRUCE HAACK, LOREN MAZZACANE CONNORS, GLEN BRANCA, ALBERT MARCOEUR, LOS ANGELES FREE MUSIC SOCIETY,THE POLYPHONIC SPREE, MICROPHONES, GARY WAR, RAILROAD JERK, MODERN LOVERS, LOVE, HAWKWIND, RAIN PARADE, RALPH CARNEY, ROBERT WYATT, LUCIA PAMELA, RON SEXSMITH, ROWLAND S. HOWARD, SAFETY SCISSORS, RICHARD HELL & VOIDOIDS, SACCHARINE TRUST,THE NOTWIST,QUICKSPACE, ROY MONTGOMERY, THE CLEAN, THE BATS, RUN ON, LOVELY LITTLE GIRLS, LONG FIN KILLIE, SAFETY SCISSORS, BRIDE OF NO NO, TONE DOGS, TREAT HER RIGHT, TRIPOD JIMMIE, LIFTER PULLER, THEY MIGHT BY GIANTS, GANG OF FOUR, SOUL COUGHING- MIKE DOUGHTY, MAZARIN, KARATE- GEOFF FARINA, SECRET STARS, THE CHURCH, BLANK DOGS, FROG EYES, JOAN OF ARC, BLACKOUT BEACH, DIRTY BEACHES, PURE X, MAGIC TRICK-TIN COHEN, CHRIS COHEN, DAVID BAZAN, YUNG WU, WAKE OOLOO, DRIVE BY TRUCKERS, CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN, U.S, MAPLE, MARTIN NEWELL, ERLAND and The CARNIVAL, CRIPPLED BLACK PHOENIX, CALIFONE, THE BLACK HEART PROCESSION, CLOUD CULT, EZRA FURMAN and THE HARPOONS, EFF BARZELAY, BORN RUFIANS, FERGUS & GERONIMO, CHAIN AND THE GANG - Ian Svenonius- WEIRD WAR,- THE MAKE UP, MOONFACE, THREE MILE PILOT, LIFE WITHOUT BUILDINGS, PINBACK, MAGIC HOUR, MAJOR STARS, MAPS & ATLASES, MEGAFAUN, MENOMENA, TAME IMPALA, AMPS FOR CHRIST, ARBOURETUM, TRUE WIDOW, NANA GRIZOL,TIMBER TIMBRE,THE IMPOSSIBLE SHAPES, THE LOVE EVERYTHING,THE MAE SHI, DEAD SKELETONS, THE SHIPPING NEWS, LES SAVY FAV, SILKWORM, DIANOGAH, THE COMSAT ANGELS, GASTR DEL SOL, 31 KNOTS, 90 DAY MEN, ORANGE JUICE,
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Mick Harvey joins Roland S. Howard and bassplayer on stage

Durian addiction takes married couple around the world

Rob Culclasure and Lindsay Gasik are a husband and wife team who have spent the last two years travelling the world eating durians.

In Asia, the durian is known as the King of Fruits, but in Australia the big spiky fruit is not as well known, or well regarded, with many Aussie consumers put off by its strong odour.

Rob and Lindsay have documented their durian adventures through the website www.yearofthedurian.com.

Lindsay says there are thousands of varieties across south-east Asia and there’s something to suit everyone’s taste buds.

"You can have one that’s strong and pungent and smelly, or one that’s very sweet like frosting, or you can have one that’s more bitter and deep like a dark-chocolate or a wine," she said.

"So there’s all these different flavours and you get to know your durians like a wine connoisseur or a cheese connoisseur.

"I think people (in western societies) are just starting to get exposed to it and unfortunately our media portrays it as a bad thing too often, which gives people a bad impression.

"So it would be great if people could keep an open mind and remember it’s just a new and bizarre food, it’s exotic and exciting… and I think with time, people are going to learn to enjoy it and maybe become addicts like us."

feliz dia da terra

feliz dia da terra

Eric Dolphy - Out to Lunch! (Blue Note, 1964)
Among players whose collaborations with Coltrane upset the jazz establishment, Eric Dolphy came before Archie Shepp and Pharaoh Sanders. And today, Dolphy still comes before them in the avant-garde’s heart. His inimitable, multi-textured voice on three instruments — alto sax, bass clarinet, and flute — has had a lasting influence, just as his virtuosic, classical-level technique has inspired countless woodshedders. (Dolphy could pull off Varèse in concert.) Just before his tragic death in 1964, Dolphy emerged as a master bandleader on this album. The first three minutes dart between passages of walking-bass feel and swaying-then-stabbing moments, with the variations serving as a set-up for Dolphy’s solo, during which he vaults over skyscrapers with nimble interval-jumps, and then, after landing, digs deep into the ground with power-growls that tear up the sidewalk like a Con Ed crew. 
S.W.
Eric Dolphy - Out to Lunch! (Blue Note, 1964)
Among players whose collaborations with Coltrane upset the jazz establishment, Eric Dolphy came before Archie Shepp and Pharaoh Sanders. And today, Dolphy still comes before them in the avant-garde’s heart. His inimitable, multi-textured voice on three instruments — alto sax, bass clarinet, and flute — has had a lasting influence, just as his virtuosic, classical-level technique has inspired countless woodshedders. (Dolphy could pull off Varèse in concert.) Just before his tragic death in 1964, Dolphy emerged as a master bandleader on this album. The first three minutes dart between passages of walking-bass feel and swaying-then-stabbing moments, with the variations serving as a set-up for Dolphy’s solo, during which he vaults over skyscrapers with nimble interval-jumps, and then, after landing, digs deep into the ground with power-growls that tear up the sidewalk like a Con Ed crew. 
S.W.
The Roland Kirk Quartet - Rip, Rig & Panic (Limelight, 1965)
Beyond exhibiting Kirk’s then-novel ability to circular breathe through multiple horns at once, as at the beginning of “Mystical Dream,” Rip, Rig and Panic offers a bracing wake-up call in the form of a wild roller-coaster ride through jazz’s past, present, and future. Pianist Jacki Byard and drummer Elvin Jones rarely sounded more dynamically engaged than here, as they collectively recapture the ragtime, stride, and boogie-woogie futurism of “From Bechet, Byas, and Fats”; revel in the title track’s explosive freedom; or bop past the Varèse-ian electronics that introduce “Slippery, Hippery, Flippery.” Kirk sounds simply epic throughout, waxing sentimental and ecstatically raging in a heartbeat. No wonder he could share bills with rock bands (including Led Zeppelin) and leave them gasping, or that Neneh Cherry and members of the Pop Group copped this album’s title for their own outside project in 1981. 
R.G.
The Roland Kirk Quartet - Rip, Rig & Panic (Limelight, 1965)
Beyond exhibiting Kirk’s then-novel ability to circular breathe through multiple horns at once, as at the beginning of “Mystical Dream,” Rip, Rig and Panic offers a bracing wake-up call in the form of a wild roller-coaster ride through jazz’s past, present, and future. Pianist Jacki Byard and drummer Elvin Jones rarely sounded more dynamically engaged than here, as they collectively recapture the ragtime, stride, and boogie-woogie futurism of “From Bechet, Byas, and Fats”; revel in the title track’s explosive freedom; or bop past the Varèse-ian electronics that introduce “Slippery, Hippery, Flippery.” Kirk sounds simply epic throughout, waxing sentimental and ecstatically raging in a heartbeat. No wonder he could share bills with rock bands (including Led Zeppelin) and leave them gasping, or that Neneh Cherry and members of the Pop Group copped this album’s title for their own outside project in 1981. 
R.G.
Caetano Veloso - Caetano Veloso (Philips, 1969)
The second of three eponymous albums the Brazilian singer, composer, and political activist released between 1968 and 1971, the record known as Caetano Veloso’s Àlbum Branco (Portugese for “White Album”) remains a key statement of the short-lived Tropicalia movement. A cultural revolution that also encompassed poetry, theater, film, and visual art, Tropicalia’s fusion of avant-garde and pop (especially American imports), riled both the sanctimonious left and the authoritarian right in late-’60s Brazil. In fact, Veloso’s vocals, accompanied by Gilberto Gil’s acoustic guitar, were recorded during the pair’s imprisonment by the Brazilian military government (both were exiled soon after, unable to return to Brazil until 1972). Producer Rogério Duprat added dizzying arrangements of classical strings, jazzy horns, and fuzzed-out acid rock guitars to create a zesty stew of bossa nova, fado, tango, and Bahian carnival music, further spiced with a dash of post-Sgt. Pepper psychedelic rock. Though Veloso sings most of the album in Portugese (with the exception of the melancholic “The Empty Boat” and the allegorical “Lost In the Paradise”), his distinctive recipe for cross-cultural polyglottony has universal appeal. 
M. R.
Caetano Veloso - Caetano Veloso (Philips, 1969)
The second of three eponymous albums the Brazilian singer, composer, and political activist released between 1968 and 1971, the record known as Caetano Veloso’s Àlbum Branco (Portugese for “White Album”) remains a key statement of the short-lived Tropicalia movement. A cultural revolution that also encompassed poetry, theater, film, and visual art, Tropicalia’s fusion of avant-garde and pop (especially American imports), riled both the sanctimonious left and the authoritarian right in late-’60s Brazil. In fact, Veloso’s vocals, accompanied by Gilberto Gil’s acoustic guitar, were recorded during the pair’s imprisonment by the Brazilian military government (both were exiled soon after, unable to return to Brazil until 1972). Producer Rogério Duprat added dizzying arrangements of classical strings, jazzy horns, and fuzzed-out acid rock guitars to create a zesty stew of bossa nova, fado, tango, and Bahian carnival music, further spiced with a dash of post-Sgt. Pepper psychedelic rock. Though Veloso sings most of the album in Portugese (with the exception of the melancholic “The Empty Boat” and the allegorical “Lost In the Paradise”), his distinctive recipe for cross-cultural polyglottony has universal appeal. 
M. R.
Various Artists - The Balinese Gamelan: Music From the Morning of the World (Nonesuch, 1967)
For American pop audiences, music from the far-flung pages of the atlas had been the province of World’s Fairs, college campuses, obscure 78s, and the odd Folkways release, until producer David Lewiston returned from Indonesia with field recordings of what he termed “music from the morning of the world.” Their subsequent release on Nonesuch Records, which helped to inaugurate the label’s vaunted Explorer Series, was the first Western exposure to the gamelan, a collection of specially-tuned microtonal pitched percussion considered by the players to be one instrument, and which sounds like a thousand toy pianos twinkling madly. Moonshot psychonauts had nothing on the otherworldiness of Balinese lullabies or the proto-hardcore rhythmic shouting of ketjak ”monkey chants.” 
J.J.
Various Artists - The Balinese Gamelan: Music From the Morning of the World (Nonesuch, 1967)
For American pop audiences, music from the far-flung pages of the atlas had been the province of World’s Fairs, college campuses, obscure 78s, and the odd Folkways release, until producer David Lewiston returned from Indonesia with field recordings of what he termed “music from the morning of the world.” Their subsequent release on Nonesuch Records, which helped to inaugurate the label’s vaunted Explorer Series, was the first Western exposure to the gamelan, a collection of specially-tuned microtonal pitched percussion considered by the players to be one instrument, and which sounds like a thousand toy pianos twinkling madly. Moonshot psychonauts had nothing on the otherworldiness of Balinese lullabies or the proto-hardcore rhythmic shouting of ketjak ”monkey chants.” 
J.J.
Pauline Oliveros – Reverberations: Tape & Electronic Music 1961-1970 (Important, 2012)
She was there at the San Francisco Tape Music Center — alongside Terry Riley and Morton Subotnick — in the 1960s and her pioneering studies with tape delay were critical in the advancement of American experimental music. Yet for a long time, Pauline Oliveros’ name wasn’t so well-known. That’s changed in recent years, partially due to this 12-CD set of Oliveros’ electronic and tape pieces from the 1960s. After Cage made the world safe for silence, Oliveros made it safe for noise, pushing the new electronic tools of the time to harsh extremes, as pieces such as “50-50 Heads/Tails” reveal. Unlike Stockhausen, she wasn’t a prognosticator of strict new styles, instead adopting an intuitive, receptive approach to the new sounds made possible by throwing out the users’ manuals. The early “Mnemonics” studies reveal Oliveros’s gripping way with longform improvisation-composition; the buzzing oscillations and echoing tape-manipulations achieve a charm that feels influenced by Oliveros’ curious, open-minded attitude. And these 12-plus hours of early experiments only show one side of her art; her electro-acoustic explorations and extended-technique accordion playing still transport audiences to this day. 
S.W.
Pauline Oliveros – Reverberations: Tape & Electronic Music 1961-1970 (Important, 2012)
She was there at the San Francisco Tape Music Center — alongside Terry Riley and Morton Subotnick — in the 1960s and her pioneering studies with tape delay were critical in the advancement of American experimental music. Yet for a long time, Pauline Oliveros’ name wasn’t so well-known. That’s changed in recent years, partially due to this 12-CD set of Oliveros’ electronic and tape pieces from the 1960s. After Cage made the world safe for silence, Oliveros made it safe for noise, pushing the new electronic tools of the time to harsh extremes, as pieces such as “50-50 Heads/Tails” reveal. Unlike Stockhausen, she wasn’t a prognosticator of strict new styles, instead adopting an intuitive, receptive approach to the new sounds made possible by throwing out the users’ manuals. The early “Mnemonics” studies reveal Oliveros’s gripping way with longform improvisation-composition; the buzzing oscillations and echoing tape-manipulations achieve a charm that feels influenced by Oliveros’ curious, open-minded attitude. And these 12-plus hours of early experiments only show one side of her art; her electro-acoustic explorations and extended-technique accordion playing still transport audiences to this day. 
S.W.
Morton Subotnick – Silver Apples of the Moon (Nonesuch, 1967)
The electronic masterpiece Silver Apples of the Moon, realized on the new Buchla 100 synthesizer, was a modern classical piece that leapt right over the idea of ever appearing in a concert hall — or even an alternative performance space — and delivered it straight to vinyl. Here, the pioneering West Coast composer Morton Subotnick made a lyrical advance beyond most early synthesizer experiments: There are actual hooks to be found amid the composer’s toying with ostinatos and riffs. And there’s also an improvisatory feel —’ enabled by the Buchla 100 — that confirms the influence of Pauline Oliveros’ intuitive approach. Subotnick would keep tilling purely electronic fields for another decade, but Silver Apples remains his major statement, a manifesto on behalf of the idea that electronic music need not be forever “otherwordly” in its textures or rhythms. 
S.W.
Morton Subotnick – Silver Apples of the Moon (Nonesuch, 1967)
The electronic masterpiece Silver Apples of the Moon, realized on the new Buchla 100 synthesizer, was a modern classical piece that leapt right over the idea of ever appearing in a concert hall — or even an alternative performance space — and delivered it straight to vinyl. Here, the pioneering West Coast composer Morton Subotnick made a lyrical advance beyond most early synthesizer experiments: There are actual hooks to be found amid the composer’s toying with ostinatos and riffs. And there’s also an improvisatory feel —’ enabled by the Buchla 100 — that confirms the influence of Pauline Oliveros’ intuitive approach. Subotnick would keep tilling purely electronic fields for another decade, but Silver Apples remains his major statement, a manifesto on behalf of the idea that electronic music need not be forever “otherwordly” in its textures or rhythms. 
S.W.
Perrey-Kingsley - The In Sound From Way Out! (Vanguard, 1966)
When pioneering French electronic musician Jean-Jacques Perrey moved to New York to experiment with the tape-loop techniques being pioneered by the classical avant-garde, he met up with German-born Gershon Kingsley, a former colleague of John Cage and staff arranger at the mostly folky Vanguard label. Together the pair created the very first mainstream-aimed electronic music album. Bridging huge gaps between tony musique concrète, easy-listening kitsch, prototypical synth-pop, and boings and bangs that could’ve been lifted from Looney Tunes cartoons, The In Sound is as giddy as music gets. Anticipating the pitch-shifting of drum and bass and happy hardcore, Perrey painstakingly cut-and-pasted frantic, ridiculously fun ditties like “The Unidentified Flying Object” while Kingsley filled in the blanks with blatant camp. Thirty years later, the Beastie Boys paid tribute with their identically titled and similarly packaged instrumental comp, and in 1997, Smash Mouth pillaged the album’s “Swan’s Splashdown” for No. 2 single “Walkin’ on the Sun.” 
B.W.
Perrey-Kingsley - The In Sound From Way Out! (Vanguard, 1966)
When pioneering French electronic musician Jean-Jacques Perrey moved to New York to experiment with the tape-loop techniques being pioneered by the classical avant-garde, he met up with German-born Gershon Kingsley, a former colleague of John Cage and staff arranger at the mostly folky Vanguard label. Together the pair created the very first mainstream-aimed electronic music album. Bridging huge gaps between tony musique concrète, easy-listening kitsch, prototypical synth-pop, and boings and bangs that could’ve been lifted from Looney Tunes cartoons, The In Sound is as giddy as music gets. Anticipating the pitch-shifting of drum and bass and happy hardcore, Perrey painstakingly cut-and-pasted frantic, ridiculously fun ditties like “The Unidentified Flying Object” while Kingsley filled in the blanks with blatant camp. Thirty years later, the Beastie Boys paid tribute with their identically titled and similarly packaged instrumental comp, and in 1997, Smash Mouth pillaged the album’s “Swan’s Splashdown” for No. 2 single “Walkin’ on the Sun.” 
B.W.
Terry Riley – A Rainbow in Curved Air (CBS, 1969)
There are almost too many great interpretations of In C, Riley’s conceptual triumph, so Rainbow in Curved Air was the concrete reminder of who Riley was, on his own, during minimalism’s first wave. While La Monte Young was droning and Steve Reich was clapping, Riley was showing how to be hyperactively minimalist. With the help of multi-tracking, the composer showered the listener with superimposed blizzards of electronic notes. Even the more blissed-out “Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band” on Side B featured some urgent sax playing from Riley underneath the thrumming keyboard part. You can hear the jazzlike flexibility of Riley’s mind throughout: never the most dogmatic of composer-theoreticians, he’ll improvise endlessly within a given structure (as on 2012’s two-CDAleph for Tzadik). Though The Who was the earliest and most well-known band to cite Riley’s electronic textures and repetitive strategies as an influence (see their dedication “Baba O’Riley”), their appreciation hardly marks the apex of this record’s impact on decades of electronic music to come. 
S.W.
Terry Riley – A Rainbow in Curved Air (CBS, 1969)
There are almost too many great interpretations of In C, Riley’s conceptual triumph, so Rainbow in Curved Air was the concrete reminder of who Riley was, on his own, during minimalism’s first wave. While La Monte Young was droning and Steve Reich was clapping, Riley was showing how to be hyperactively minimalist. With the help of multi-tracking, the composer showered the listener with superimposed blizzards of electronic notes. Even the more blissed-out “Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band” on Side B featured some urgent sax playing from Riley underneath the thrumming keyboard part. You can hear the jazzlike flexibility of Riley’s mind throughout: never the most dogmatic of composer-theoreticians, he’ll improvise endlessly within a given structure (as on 2012’s two-CDAleph for Tzadik). Though The Who was the earliest and most well-known band to cite Riley’s electronic textures and repetitive strategies as an influence (see their dedication “Baba O’Riley”), their appreciation hardly marks the apex of this record’s impact on decades of electronic music to come. 
S.W.
Nico - Chelsea Girl (Verve, 1967)
"The first time I heard the album I cried," said German singer-songwriter Nico, speaking about her solo debut,Chelsea Girl, in 1981, “and it was all because of the flute.” For her, the album was too soft, too lush, not nearly stark enough. (A problem she soon rectified with a harrowing pair of albums, The Marble Index and Desertshore.) For everyone else, though, the icy Teutonic wraith was, just this once, approachably human. A huge part of that had to do with a warm, empathetic set of songs. Nico applied her entrancing honk to winsome, bittersweet compositions by former Velvet Underground bandmates John Cale, Sterling Morrison, and Lou Reed, as well as Bob Dylan (the charming “I’ll Keep It With Mine”), doomed folkie Tim Hardin, and a then-teenaged Jackson Browne, who never wrote anything better than the nostalgic “These Days.” The songs were painted in the vibrantly decaying autumnal colors — woodwinds and strings, clean guitars, and that wispy flute — giving everything a gently existential, chamber-folk air, one subsequently adopted by the likes of Belle & Sebastian and Sharon Van Etten. On Chelsea Girl, Nico looked into the void, and the void smiled resignedly back. 
D.M.
Nico - Chelsea Girl (Verve, 1967)
"The first time I heard the album I cried," said German singer-songwriter Nico, speaking about her solo debut,Chelsea Girl, in 1981, “and it was all because of the flute.” For her, the album was too soft, too lush, not nearly stark enough. (A problem she soon rectified with a harrowing pair of albums, The Marble Index and Desertshore.) For everyone else, though, the icy Teutonic wraith was, just this once, approachably human. A huge part of that had to do with a warm, empathetic set of songs. Nico applied her entrancing honk to winsome, bittersweet compositions by former Velvet Underground bandmates John Cale, Sterling Morrison, and Lou Reed, as well as Bob Dylan (the charming “I’ll Keep It With Mine”), doomed folkie Tim Hardin, and a then-teenaged Jackson Browne, who never wrote anything better than the nostalgic “These Days.” The songs were painted in the vibrantly decaying autumnal colors — woodwinds and strings, clean guitars, and that wispy flute — giving everything a gently existential, chamber-folk air, one subsequently adopted by the likes of Belle & Sebastian and Sharon Van Etten. On Chelsea Girl, Nico looked into the void, and the void smiled resignedly back. 
D.M.
The Peter Brötzmann Octet - Machine Gun (BRÖ, 1968)
A mustachioed Wuppertal autodidact assembles an international octet in May of 1968, the year of the Paris strikes and the peak of Vietnam, and detonates the strongest blast of “energy music” yet unleashed upon a bewildered jazz audience. This three-track political statement — boasting the leader’s own silkscreen artwork, barely rising above bootleg sound quality, printed in small numbers and mostly sold at Brötzmann’s gigs — would serve as ground zero for European free jazz. The lineup came to define the continental underground: Evan Parker, Willem Breuker, Han Bennink, Peter Kowald, Fred Van Hove. And as music, the title track was unrelenting in ways that rock bands couldn’t manage: 18 minutes of continual sound blasts, lung-collapsing massed skronk that avoids any semblance of melodic content until the 15-minute mark, when a merciful leader briefly let his cavalry indulge in some bar-band-from-hell swing. Possibly the most raging piece of jazz to this day. 
J.G.
The Peter Brötzmann Octet - Machine Gun (BRÖ, 1968)
A mustachioed Wuppertal autodidact assembles an international octet in May of 1968, the year of the Paris strikes and the peak of Vietnam, and detonates the strongest blast of “energy music” yet unleashed upon a bewildered jazz audience. This three-track political statement — boasting the leader’s own silkscreen artwork, barely rising above bootleg sound quality, printed in small numbers and mostly sold at Brötzmann’s gigs — would serve as ground zero for European free jazz. The lineup came to define the continental underground: Evan Parker, Willem Breuker, Han Bennink, Peter Kowald, Fred Van Hove. And as music, the title track was unrelenting in ways that rock bands couldn’t manage: 18 minutes of continual sound blasts, lung-collapsing massed skronk that avoids any semblance of melodic content until the 15-minute mark, when a merciful leader briefly let his cavalry indulge in some bar-band-from-hell swing. Possibly the most raging piece of jazz to this day. 
J.G.
The Meters – The Meters (Josie, 1969)
The 1960s birthed any number of important R&B instrumentalists — Kool and the Gang, the Bar-Kays, the ever-changing James Brown band — but few boasted a heavier sound than New Orleans’ the Meters. Built around just four members — Art Neville, Leo Nocentelli, George Porter Jr. and Zigaboo Modeliste ૼ the Meters crafted a landmark style in funk’s evolution, bridging New Orleans’ distinctive “second line” dance rhythms to the musical mainstream. Bassist Porter and drummer Modeliste anchored the low end (“Cardova”), while Neville’s wheezed in on keys (“Here Comes the Meter Man”), and Nocentelli’s twitchy, plucky guitar added both melodic and rhythmic accents (“Ease Back”). Unlike more cover-driven albums of the time, The Meters only had a couple, including a sublimely moody version of “Stormy,” but the originals such as “Sophisticated Cissy” and “Cissy Strut” inspired the greatest fanfare, especially amongst later generations of sample-hungry hip-hop producers. 
O.W.
The Meters – The Meters (Josie, 1969)
The 1960s birthed any number of important R&B instrumentalists — Kool and the Gang, the Bar-Kays, the ever-changing James Brown band — but few boasted a heavier sound than New Orleans’ the Meters. Built around just four members — Art Neville, Leo Nocentelli, George Porter Jr. and Zigaboo Modeliste ૼ the Meters crafted a landmark style in funk’s evolution, bridging New Orleans’ distinctive “second line” dance rhythms to the musical mainstream. Bassist Porter and drummer Modeliste anchored the low end (“Cardova”), while Neville’s wheezed in on keys (“Here Comes the Meter Man”), and Nocentelli’s twitchy, plucky guitar added both melodic and rhythmic accents (“Ease Back”). Unlike more cover-driven albums of the time, The Meters only had a couple, including a sublimely moody version of “Stormy,” but the originals such as “Sophisticated Cissy” and “Cissy Strut” inspired the greatest fanfare, especially amongst later generations of sample-hungry hip-hop producers. 
O.W.
Nick Drake - Five Leaves Left (Island, 1969)
Released when he was only 21, the prodigious 1969 debut by former Cambridge student Nick Drake seems to exist out of time. Unlike his timely, socially conscious post-Woodstock peers, Drake avoids all temporal references beyond those found in nature. Instead, he sings of women and men and suggestions of emotional intimacy, but no lust, no carnality — just a longing for peace of mind, implied not necessarily through words but through an overwhelming wistfulness. Employing unconventional guitar tunings and compositional sophistication far beyond ordinary folk music, Drake croons squarely on the notes, as if the air just poured out of him and into precisely the right places without any effort. On “Fruit Tree,” he contemplates fame as something impossible to measure until well after death. Decades after Drake’s 1974 overdose from prescribed antidepressants, this album, virtually unheard at the time of its release, is universally acknowledged as among the greatest English folk statements ever made. 
B.W.
Nick Drake - Five Leaves Left (Island, 1969)
Released when he was only 21, the prodigious 1969 debut by former Cambridge student Nick Drake seems to exist out of time. Unlike his timely, socially conscious post-Woodstock peers, Drake avoids all temporal references beyond those found in nature. Instead, he sings of women and men and suggestions of emotional intimacy, but no lust, no carnality — just a longing for peace of mind, implied not necessarily through words but through an overwhelming wistfulness. Employing unconventional guitar tunings and compositional sophistication far beyond ordinary folk music, Drake croons squarely on the notes, as if the air just poured out of him and into precisely the right places without any effort. On “Fruit Tree,” he contemplates fame as something impossible to measure until well after death. Decades after Drake’s 1974 overdose from prescribed antidepressants, this album, virtually unheard at the time of its release, is universally acknowledged as among the greatest English folk statements ever made. 
B.W.